Some of The Terms Used in Saving Your Home

If you are working with your lender to keep your home there are several options:

  • Reinstatement: Your lender may agree to let you pay the total amount you are behind, in a lump sum payment and by a specific date. This is often combined with forbearance when you can show that funds from a bonus, tax refund, or other source will become available at a specific time in the future. Be aware that there may be late fees and other costs associated with a reinstatement plan.
  • Forbearance: Your lender may offer a temporary reduction or suspension of your mortgage payments while you get back on your feet. Forbearance is often combined with a reinstatement or a repayment plan to pay off the missed or reduced mortgage payments.
  • Repayment Plan: This is an agreement that gives you a fixed amount of time to repay the amount you are behind by combining a portion of what is past due with your regular monthly payment. At the end of the repayment period you have gradually paid back the amount of your mortgage that was delinquent.
  • Loan modification: This is a written agreement between you and your mortgage company that permanently changes one or more of the original terms of your note to make the payments more affordable. For an example: Mortgage interest rate, term of mortgage, and possibly principal reduction.

If you and your lender agree that you cannot keep your home, there are a number of liquidation terms you should understand:

  • Short Payoff/Short Sale: If you can sell your house but the sale proceeds are less than the total amount you owe on your mortgage, your mortgage company may agree to a short payoff and write off the portion of your mortgage that exceeds the net proceeds from the sale.
  • Deed-in-lieu of foreclosure/Voluntary giving us back to bank: A deed-in-lieu of foreclosure is a cancellation of your mortgage if you voluntarily transfer title of your property to your mortgage company. Usually you must try to sell your home for its fair market value for at least 90 days before a mortgage company will consider this option. A deed-in-lieu of foreclosure may not be an option if there are other liens on the property, such as second mortgages, judgments from creditors, or tax liens.
  • Assumption: An assumption permits a qualified buyer to take over your mortgage debt and make the mortgage payments, even if the mortgage is non-assumable. As a result, you may be able to sell your property and avoid foreclosure.

offers a FREE service to struggling homeowners who need help applying for the government’s Home Affordable Modification program and other loan modification options offered by lenders and servicers. This FREE online software has a 100% no commitment, no credit card required to use their services. Find use ful tools and online support to ask your questions about the loan modification process and other concerns about the foreclosure process. Follow us on and Twitter! If you have stories or comments please post them on our Facebook page.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

no background